Ghana Grains Council (GGC) in collaboration with the Business Sector Advocacy Challenge Fund (BUSAC Fund) with support by USAID and DANIDA is embarking on a month-long advocacy campaign to sensitise members and other stakeholders in the agricultural commodity markets value chain.

The campaign will focus on grains and legumes in Ghana on the need to enforce standards in the industry.

Living up to its mandate, an intervention in the grains value chain for quality, productivity and profitability, GGC has earmarked a month-long sensitization drive which kick-started from the Volta Regional capital, Ho, through to Ejura in Ashanti Region, Techiman, Bono East region, Wa and Tumu in Upper West Region, Bolgatanga in the Upper East Region and Tamale the Northern region.

 The Ghana Grains Council will engage with major stakeholders (Ghana Standards Authority-GSA, Food and Drugs Authority – FDA, Representatives of the major grains market centres and all value chain actors.

Essence of enforcing standards

The Ghana Grains Council (GGC) and the Ghana Standards Authority (GSA) have developed standards for grains and legumes such as Maize, Rice, Soybean, Sorghum and Groundnut.

It is imperative therefore for all value chain actors to appreciate the overarching importance of the adoption and enforcement of these standards herein developed by the regulators since apart from the strategic value-added services they stand to gain which include but is not limited to; warehouse receipting, advocacy, and capacity building they also get access to high-end markets and most importantly obtain premium prices.

The GGC realizes that certain key factors militate against the adherence to the set standards set by the GSA, as being either the current voluntary nature of the enforcement and knowledge gap on benefits of incorporating such standards by industry players.

It is therefore against this backdrop that the GGC through her collaborating organizations, i.e. BUSAC FUND, is embarking on this campaign to build capacity, educate stakeholders, i.e. farmers, FBO’s, traders, processors, millers, warehouse operators, aggregators etc… on the essence of the enforcement of standards since it is invariably in their own collective interest.

Standards

Grain standard specification covers the characteristics for the grain and set requirements for three main areas such as  Safety, Quality Sampling and test methods.

To wit, each type of grain has its own standards. The standard for maize is different from that of sorghum, soybeans, rice etc.

Market Access

It is essential to note that as reiterated, compliance to these standards will enhance the competitiveness of our value chain actors to have access to high-end markets and ultimately help them to better position themselves to leverage on the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA)

The African Continental Free Trade Area is a free trade area which creates a single market, deepening the economic integration of the continent.

The grain industry can, therefore, tap into markets of member countries within the African Continental Free Trade Area by linking markets to actors within the grain value chain.

Acting Executive Secretary of GGC Mrs Emily Boahen appeals to all members, government, public institutions and stakeholders to collaborate and help facilitate extended market access, influence policy change and also adhere to standards and regulations in Ghana’s grains sub-sector since that is the sure way for increasing economic growth and productivity.

About Ghana Grains Council (GGC)

GGC is a private sector-led initiative formed with initial funding from USAID’s ATP and ADVANCE projects. It is a body formed by leaders in the grains business with the aim of positively intervening in the grains and legume value chain to achieve improvement in productivity, quality and greater commercialization of the industry. Membership consists of farmers, FBO’s, traders, processors, millers, warehouse operators, aggregators, banks, non-bank financial institutions, insurance companies, collateral managers etc.