Known as one of the bibles of literary studies, George Orwell’s evergreen book, Animal Farm, on Monday marked 75 years after it was first published by British publishing company Penguin Books.

Animal Farm, first published on August 17, 1945, has been described by many book lovers as an epic piece of literature. The book is most notable for the line, “All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.”

Beyond this singular line, Orwell’s allegorical novella painted a perfect metaphor for the pseudo-equity, fairness and justice that characterise human existence, especially along the political and socio-economic lines, even till today.

Also the author of 1984, a George Orwell, whose original name was Eric Blair, achieved the magnificent work of art with a fusion of whimsical human and animal characters.

The book tells the story of a group of farm animals who rebel against the human farmer, hoping to create a society where the animals can be equal, free, and happy. But the rebellion is betrayed, and the farm ends up in a state as bad as it was before, under the dictatorship of a pig named Napoleon.

According to the author, the fable reflects events leading up to the Russian Revolution of 1917, into the Stalinist era of the Soviet Union.

Orwell did not live too long. Born on June 25, 1903, he died on January 21, 1950. However, 75 years after it first appeared in print, Orwell’s work of political satire, Animal Farm, has been a subject of academic and journalistic discourse because of its wider interpretation and appeal to virtually all facets of human relationship and existence. The book has also been used by many social commentators to analyse racism, xenophobia and all forms of discrimination.

Celebrating the classic on Monday, Penguin Books tweeted;

‘All animals are equal, but some animals are more equal than others.’

Animal Farm by George Orwell was first published #onthisday in 1945.

What’s your favourite quote from the novel?#AnimalFarm75 pic.twitter.com/7hGGCWL2GR

— Penguin Books UK (@PenguinUKBooks) August 17, 2020