Men are ditching condoms in favor of dangerous alternative

Men are ditching condoms in favor of dangerous alternative
Source: nypost.com
Date: 14-09-2017 Time: 10:09:16:am

From the pill to the coil and the implant, there are loads of options for women looking to prevent an unwanted pregnancy.

But for guys, there’s just one safe go-to — the condom.

So what happens when a guy doesn’t like condoms, has a latex allergy or simply wants a “more natural” method of contraception?

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Then there is another option, though few experts will actually advise it.

The “pulling out” or withdrawal method is where a man will pull out before he reaches climax.

But experts told the Sun Online that the risk of pregnancy is “quite high.”

And that’s not to mention it offers no protection at all against sexually transmitted disease.

So what is the stumbling block when it comes to the “pulling out” method?

Its success rests on a man’s self-control, and let’s face it, self-control in the heat of the moment can be tough for anyone.

Yet more and more young guys are opting for the withdrawal method, new figures reveal.

The number of men relying on this risky practice has doubled from around 10 percent in 2002 to 19 percent in 2015, according to a new report from the National Center for Health Statistics.

And young, unmarried men are most likely to rely on “pulling out,” despite warnings that it’s not a reliable form of birth control.

Sexual health charity the Family Planning Association (FPA) said around 22 in every 100 women will get pregnant while relying on the withdrawal method of contraception.

That means it’s only around 78 percent effective, compared to the condom, which is 98 percent effective.

And the reason it fails is that men often won’t pull out fast enough.

And here’s the real catch: Even if a guy does pull out fast enough, there’s still a fairly high risk of getting pregnant.

A study from 2011 found the fluid released before ejaculation (pre-ejaculate) can contain live, fully functioning sperm, ready and raring to make a dash to fertilize the egg.

Natika Halil, chief executive of FPA, said: “Some couples might choose to rely on withdrawal but this can be notoriously difficult to get right so your risk of pregnancy is quite high.”

“Because it can be so hard to use withdrawal correctly and consistently, we don’t consider it reliable enough to count as a method of contraception and recommend instead choosing one of the 15 contraceptive methods available.”

“The only way for it to be more reliable is to do it correctly and consistently every time, but this can be hard for many people to achieve.”

And Halil said another major concern is that unlike condoms, the withdrawal method doesn’t protect at all against sexually transmitted disease.

So not only are fans of the “pulling out” method risking becoming a parent, they’re also risking another nasty surprise in the form of an STD (some of which you can’t cure)!

Last year a survey revealed that more women in Europe were relying on the withdrawal method than anywhere else in the world.

The results, which came from analysis of a UN report by Superdrug, show that 7.8 percent of couples use the method, even though it is one of the least reliable — with a 27 percent failure rate in couples who don’t time it perfectly.

Halil added: “It’s estimated that approximately 4 to 6 percent of women in the UK may be using withdrawal.”

“It may often be used in relationships, where couples may be more relaxed about whether or not they get pregnant.”

“A bad experience on another type of contraception, or concerns about side effects, can also contribute to people deciding to try withdrawal.”

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