Information Minister Kojo Oppong Nkrumah has disputed claims that the plebiscite that saw to the creation of the Volta Region was time-bound.

Speaking to the press Sunday, he said about 58% of the populace voted to be part of Ghana following a plebiscite in 1956.

“It is not true that the plebiscite was time-bound and that after some years somebody can opt-out of it.

“It is also not true that the majority of persons in the plebiscite are voted not to be part of Ghana, that is not true, I think about 58% or so voted to be part of Ghana,” he added.

His comment comes in reaction to the Homeland Study Group Foundation’s argument that the agreement to join Ghana included forming a union in 50 years, hence, the group’s advocacy for separation from Ghana since 2007.

The group is pursuing a campaign for the Volta and Oti regions to split from Ghana, to form a sovereign state called Western Togoland.

According to the Information Minister, these clusters have ventured into areas that were not even part of the conclusions reached in the plebiscite.

“It begins to give the impression that there are motives beyond the substantive claim that are being made by these groups.”

He emphasised that the security agencies are dealing with the issue diligently to de-escalate the situation.

However, he mentioned that the issue at hand is being looked at as a criminal act against the laws of the country.

“You have to do it in a balanced manner so that you don’t overreact and end up escalating tensions further as it has been observed in other countries and other jurisdictions. When you overreact to some of these situations, things rather get out of hand.

“It’s been a balance between the rule of law and using what we call adequate or appropriate force to contain the situation,” he added.

He assured Ghanaians that the perpetrators will be prosecuted in accordance with the law.