Scientists successfully harvested eggs from the last two remaining northern white rhinoceroses, potentially saving the species from extinction.

A total of 10 eggs were harvested from the female rhinos at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya, the group announced Tuesday.

Neither of the two remaining northern white rhinos – Fatu and Najin, a mother and daughter – can carry a baby to term, so scientists want to instead implant the embryos into southern white rhinos, a related subspecies.

“A special day on Ol Pejeta,” the conservancy said in a tweet. “8 eggs from Fatu and 2 eggs from Najin were harvested. Both of them are doing well and the procedure went according to plan.

“The eggs are already on their way to the Avantea Clinic in Italy to be fertilized with sperm from a northern white rhino bull.”

Sudan, the last male northern white rhino, died in Ol Pejeta in 2018.

Rhinoceros species have seen their numbers plummet as a result of widespread poaching.