Muslims celebrate Eid al-Fitr, generally marked by prayers, festive meals and new clothes.

But a lot of Muslims in Kumasi say they have had to make compromises so they can afford to celebrate.

In every Eid al-Fitr, the slaughtering and defeathering of chicken usually occupy Asamawu Mohammed Mukhtar’s home.

But due to higher prices, Asamawu buys smaller quantities, some of which she receives as gifts from relatives and neighbors.

“I have slaughtered about ten chickens but most of them were gift because I am a widow. I slaughtered small number of them this year due to rising prices. Whoever bought two for us now buys one.”

The mother of four, who lost her husband five years ago, also improvised the Eid tradition and marked the day in a different way.

The 41-year-old bought fewer clothes, for her children.

Muslims all over the world observed this year’s Eid al-Fitr amid rising global food prices.

But many are still determined to enjoy the holiday amid easing of Covid-19 restrictions.

At the Kumasi Central Mosque, thousands of Muslims attended prayers, Tuesday morning.

Asmawu says the financial challenges are worsening.

“Prices of food items and sallah outfits are very high compared to last year. As a widow, Allah is our helper. I do my best and my siblings too support. I couldn’t have looked after my children myself.”

There is a universal call for Muslims to strive for peace and harmony.

Though Covid-19 restrictions have been eased, celebrants say they will continue to take precautions.

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DISCLAIMER: The Views, Comments, Opinions, Contributions and Statements made by Readers and Contributors on this platform do not necessarily represent the views or policy of Multimedia Group Limited.