Since 2000, the production of chicken rose from 20.5 million to 74.5 million in 2017, of which over 25 million are estimated to be kept in traditional battery cages in Ghana.

Chickens kept in traditional battery cages have the space of an A4 sheet of paper to live their entire lives in. They experience frustration especially before laying eggs and as a result display agitated behaviour.

Most laying hens worldwide are confined to tiny, crowded cages without room to even spread their wings. Each hen suffers, on average, an estimated 11,207 hours of pain in her shortened life, from bone injuries and other ailments to not having access to a nest.

With no regulations on poultry welfare and more availability of cages due to ongoing abandonment in the US and EU, there is an increased use of the battery cage system resulting in the incessant abuse to chickens in Ghana.

Cage confinement of laying hens is also associated with significantly higher rates of salmonella, raising serious food safety concerns for consumers.

In a study conducted in the Accra metropolis area of Ghana, 47.6 percent of survey respondents preferred free-range eggs over eggs from hens in confined conditions.

The consumers are therefore calling for reforms of egg production and sourcing policies in Ghana by egg producers, hotels and resort facilities, food chain restaurants and retailers to improve the welfare of laying hens which is crucial in achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

By banning battery cages, millions of chickens will experience less suffering while producing better if not the same eggs.

Animal Welfare League has therefore started a petition calling on the Government of Ghana to Ban Battery Cages in Ghana.

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DISCLAIMER: The Views, Comments, Opinions, Contributions and Statements made by Readers and Contributors on this platform do not necessarily represent the views or policy of Multimedia Group Limited.