Public health facilities in the country are incurring huge revenue losses as a result of the ongoing strike by the Government and Hospital Pharmacists Association (GHOSPA).

The pharmacy departments in the hospitals contribute significantly to internally generated funds, which help sustain operations of these facilities.

According to GHOSPA, “close to Gh¢13million is being lost monthly at the Korle Bu Teaching Hospital, and the same could be said of the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital; the least said about the regional and district hospitals the better”.

Spokesperson for the Association, Patrick Kumi, says it is aware of the revenue losses and attempts by managers of health facilities to get their pharmacies working.

“We believe that such managers owe it a duty to the country to let the whole world know the massive impact the absence of the pharmacists is making instead of using behind the scene approaches,” he stated.

Pharmacists are better placed to inform and educate patients and other health care professionals on the appropriate use of medication to manage the adverse side-effects of administering medicines.

Patients are therefore disadvantaged as the safety of medication administered at the health facilities cannot be guaranteed, with the continuing strike of the pharmacists.

The public pharmacists are on strike over their market premium and implementation of a ruling by the National Labour Commission on their conversion difference and grading structure.

GHOSPA says members remain resolute to stay out of work until the Fair Wages and Salaries Commission (FWSC) complies with the NLC directive.

DISCLAIMER: The Views, Comments, Opinions, Contributions and Statements made by Readers and Contributors on this platform do not necessarily represent the views or policy of Multimedia Group Limited.
Tags:  


DISCLAIMER: The Views, Comments, Opinions, Contributions and Statements made by Readers and Contributors on this platform do not necessarily represent the views or policy of Multimedia Group Limited.