'No external assets' involved in Canadian girls' rescue - Minister

'No external assets' involved in Canadian girls' rescue - Minister
Source: Ghana|myjoyonline.com
Date: 12-06-2019 Time: 05:06:59:pm
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Information minister Kojo Oppong Nkrumah

Government has rejected claims it rescued two kidnapped Canadian girls relying on ‘external assets’.

Information minister Kojo Oppong Nkrumah was categorical at a press conference Wednesday the entire operation was executed by a team of professional security officials drawn from the Bureau for National Investigations and the counter-terrorism squad.

The reaction comes as social media was awash with speculations about Canadian involvement in the rescue.

Only days ago, at least two Canadian experts arrived in the country as the kidnapping of their nationals entered day six.

Two days after the report, news broke Wednesday morning, the girls have been rescued. At least 10 suspects have been arrested including three Nigerians. Another Nigerian is on the run, the Information minister said.

He confirmed the alleged kidnappers fired guns at the police but were overpowered. The entire operation was over by 5:25 am Wednesday.


Photos obtained from Ghanareport: Lauren Patricia Catherine Tilley,19, and Bailey Jordan Chitty,20 were kidnapped on June 4 in Kumasi.

Kojo Oppong Nkrumah was asked repeatedly about the presence of the Canadians and their role in the rescue.


But he stressed not even technical assistance such as intelligence gathering or satellite data was obtained with Canadian help.

Seeking the involvement of foreign intelligence in times of trouble or disasters is not unusual to Ghana governments.

In 2013, the government invited two American fire experts to help investigate the Kumasi Central Market fire.


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